Hemingway

literarystarbucks:

Hemingway goes up to the counter and orders one espresso. It’s hot. He drinks it in silence. It makes him remember his father’s cabin. He thinks about the woman he loved once. He does not smile. The coffee reminds him of war - short but painful, swallowed down quickly. One could order worse drinks. He leaves Starbucks and walks out into the rain.

(via finsdautomne)

New mayor Dana Cardinal issued a public rebuke of book cleaning. The mayor admitted that while books are pretty dangerous and she doesn’t recommend them for everyone, we should concentrate more on protecting ourselves from the librarians themselves who are the real danger.

Welcome to Night Vale, episode 54: A Carnival Comes to Town (via the-librarians-of-night-vale)

hildegardavon:

William Henry Rinehart, 1825-1874
Antigone pouring a libation over the corpse of ger brother Polynices, ca.1867-70, marble, 178,4x61x100,3 cm
The Metropolitan Museum of Art   Inv. 91.4
Rinehart’s sculpture represents a climactic scene from Sophocles’s tragedy, “Antigone,” written in or before 442 B.C. Antigone’s brother, Polynices, was killed by Eteokles, and then denied a proper burial because he was considered an enemy of Thebes. Against the orders of the new ruler, Creon, Antigone courageously interred Polynices. Rinehart chose to depict the moment when she pours libations over her brother’s grave, thereby stressing to the viewer the importance of fighting against tyranny for one’s civil liberties. Of all Rinehart’s sculptures, Antigone may be the most closely related to antique prototypes, showing an affinity with a draped figure once in the Vescovali collection in Rome.

hildegardavon:

William Henry Rinehart, 1825-1874

Antigone pouring a libation over the corpse of ger brother Polynices, ca.1867-70, marble, 178,4x61x100,3 cm

The Metropolitan Museum of Art   Inv. 91.4

Rinehart’s sculpture represents a climactic scene from Sophocles’s tragedy, “Antigone,” written in or before 442 B.C. Antigone’s brother, Polynices, was killed by Eteokles, and then denied a proper burial because he was considered an enemy of Thebes. Against the orders of the new ruler, Creon, Antigone courageously interred Polynices. Rinehart chose to depict the moment when she pours libations over her brother’s grave, thereby stressing to the viewer the importance of fighting against tyranny for one’s civil liberties. Of all Rinehart’s sculptures, Antigone may be the most closely related to antique prototypes, showing an affinity with a draped figure once in the Vescovali collection in Rome.

(via rudyscuriocabinet)